Delta Medix Scranton

Delta Medix Scranton

Lehigh Valley Physicians Group and Delta Medix suits buy the practise, but the Scranton hospitals disagree.

More than a month after two hospitals connected to the Commonwealth Health System dropped their objections to the deal, the sale of the Delta Medix medical practise to the Lehigh Valley Health Network and Lehigh Valley Physicians Group was completed on Tuesday.

Delta Medix agreed to sell its medical practise to Lehigh Valley Physicians Group, but two hospitals within the Commonwealth Health System have expressed interest in doing the identical , putting the deal in jeopardy.

Although the proposed sale had been reached in July, it had not yet been made public. The sale was recently made public after a motion to stop it was filed by lawyers for Scranton Quincy Hospital Co., doing business as Regional Hospital of Scranton and Moses Taylor Hospital.

The best part is that it’s all right here in the Scranton area, according to James Demopoulos, Senior president and Chief Operating Officer of LVPG. He continues by saying that by integrating Delta Medix into LVPG, locals will have easier access to the cutting-edge, comprehensive care they’ve come to expect and deserve from both organisations. there’ll be many developments in healthcare following the spring 2022 opening of Lehigh Valley Hospital-Dickson City.

Lehigh Valley was chosen by the practice’s owners, according to Lisa Lori, attorney for Delta Medix, because it provides specific services, particularly in cancer care, which can help the facility become the top medical facility and cancer treatment facility in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Lehigh Valley has an exclusive partnership with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in ny , therefore the agreement, which officials hope to shut by New Year’s Eve , will significantly improve cancer care within the area.

It’s a chance to provide Northeastern Pennsylvania with top-notch cancer treatment, said Lori on Monday.

In a letter dated September 13 to a lawyer for Regional and Moses Taylor, Lori also listed variety of reasons why she disagreed with their proposal, including doubts regarding the calibre of the hospitals’ medical care .

The argument is based on a clause in a 2017 contract between Scranton Quincy Hospital Co., a Commonwealth Health System affiliate, and Delta Medix that grants it the as long as the purchase price and other conditions are met, Delta Medix has the “right of first refusal” to block any sales of the company to a third party.

Stuart O’Neal III, an attorney for the hospital system, claims in court documents that the hospital system could meet all other requirements, including offering employment to all or any or any current Delta Medix physicians and other staff members, which it offered extra money to Delta Medix than Lehigh Valley did.

The motion requests that the sale be placed on hold while the dispute is resolved, but it withholds the price of the offers.

The matter are visiting be heard on October 28 before Judge James Gibbons.

Lori confirmed Commonwealth Health had made a far better offer, but Delta Medix had turned it down for other reasons.

It’s not about the money, she declared. Delta wants to work with Lehigh Valley and cares about the residents of Scranton.

According to Lori’s letter, which O’Neal attached to his motion, the hospitals cannot match all the services that the Lehigh Valley Physicians Group, which could also be a part of the Lehigh Valley Health Network, will offer, therefore the clause of the cancer care network agreement regarding any Delta Medix sale isn’t legally binding.

The matter are visiting be heard on October 28 before Judge James Gibbons.

Lori confirmed Commonwealth Health had made a far better offer, but Delta Medix had turned it down for other reasons.

It’s not about the money, she declared. Delta is concerned about the residents of Scranton and wants to work with the Lehigh Valley.

According to Lori’s letter, which O’Neal attached to his motion, the hospitals cannot match all the services that the Lehigh Valley Physicians Group, which could also be a part of the Lehigh Valley Health Network, will offer, therefore the clause of the cancer care network agreement regarding any Delta Medix sale isn’t legally binding.

The removal of ICU beds, ongoing staffing issues that often result in the postponement of elective surgery, the replacement of high-quality service lines, a scarcity of specialty care that forces patient transfers, and thus the general upkeep and cleanliness of the hospitals are among the issues that raise concern.

The letter also notes that the offer from the hospital system seems to spice up the base pay of the male doctors who own Delta Medix while lowering the pay of Dr. Kristine Kelley, the only female owner.

The allegations within the letter, according to Commonwealth Health spokeswoman Annmarie Poslock, “are baseless and don’t reflect the truth of care at our hospitals,” in an email.

Furthermore, “none of the Delta doctors themselves have expressed any concerns in our interactions with them that are essentially identical to those described in their own lawyer’s letter,” she added.

Lehigh Valley Health Network’s Brian Downs declined to comment.

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