Humanoid optimus robot- Tesla

Humanoid optimus robot- Tesla

Humanoid optimus robot: On September 30, Tesla unveiled several prototypes of its new Optimus humanoid robot. After a year of speculation that the robot was nothing more than a human in a suit, as well as some optimistic statements from Tesla CEO Elon Musk, many roboids tuned in to the live stream of the event (or attended in person) to see what Tesla looks like. One humanoid. Sounds robotic.

Reaction in the robotics community has been mixed. Since robotics requires knowledge of many different aspects of both software and hardware, a better understanding of the current context of the Tesla robot and its future prospects requires the input of many robotics experts, including Karna from industry and academia. World. In the middle of a walk. After scouring the internet over the weekend, I found as many expert commentators as possible. Together, they provide the most detailed and detailed view of Optimus we have ever received from Tesla.

These robotics experts have posted their thoughts on Twitter, LinkedIn, Substock, and elsewhere, and with their permission, we’ve compiled them for you below. Many of these people have written much more than we have room to include, but you can follow the link with a specific expert’s name to see their full commentary.

When will Optimus be ready?

This will be evidenced by the presentation of the robot on September 30 as part of Tesla AI Day.

At the company’s production site in California, the prototype took the stage and wowed the crowd, performing simple tasks like watering plants, carrying baskets and lifting metal rods before being shown in the video.

Optimus, originally known as the Tesla Bot, was unveiled on Tesla AI launch day in August 2021.

At last year’s event, Tesla also unveiled a new computer chip. The chip was entirely developed in-house and is used in the company’s Dojo supercomputers.

“Today’s humanoid robots are losing their brains and the ability to solve their own problems,” Musk said.

In contrast, Optimus is a “high performance robot” that Tesla aims to produce by the millions. Each one will cost less than $20,000, he said.

Tesla is in the process of hiring people to work on humanoid bipedal robots, Reuters reported. Teslabot has about 20 jobs, including assembly work for components such as actuators.

“The code you write runs on millions of humanoid robots around the world and therefore meets high quality standards,” the job posting says.

What does Optimus look like and what does he do?

An adult robot is 173 cm tall and weighs 57 kg. It can be programmed for everyday tasks such as assembling auto parts, moving parts in factories, and storing products.

At one point, Mr. Musk said that Optimus “has significant opportunities beyond the automotive business.”

It is controlled by the same artificial intelligence system that Tesla is developing for use in its electric vehicles.

In the future, according to Musk, “manual labor will be replaced.” Tesla is probably the largest robotics company in the world. Our cars are essentially semi-intelligent robots on wheels.

Contrary to most portrayals, the robots are “friendly” and built by humans for humans, Musk said.

“On a mechanical level, you can run away from it – and essentially overtake it,” he said.

Elon highlights the dangers of robots and AI…

Despite his own efforts in 2017 to increase the use of technologies like artificial intelligence and robots, Musk remained cautious.

“I think advanced artificial intelligence is available, and I think people should be very concerned about it. Musk called it “the biggest threat we face as a civilization.”

“Unlike car crashes, plane crashes, bad medicine or bad food, AI is a fundamental threat to the survival of human civilization,” he said.

Optimus is suspicious…

Yes, mainly because robots will struggle with unpredictability, just like self-driving cars.

“Self-driving cars aren’t as easy as people think.” And they look like humanoid robots,” Sean Azimi, head of NASA’s Dexter Robotics Group, told Reuters.

“If something unexpected happens, it’s very difficult to adapt and be resilient to that kind of change.”

For Tesla to be successful, it needs to show a robot that can perform many unprogrammed actions, according to Nancy Cook, professor of human systems engineering at Arizona State University.

“If he’s just messing with a robot or dancing with a robot, it’s already done. Not very impressed,” he said.

Henry Ben Amor, professor of robotics at Arizona State University, said, “Mr. Musk called the $20,000 price target a good deal, since the current cost of a humanoid robot is about $100,000.

What else is in development at Tesla?

The company is also working on a vehicle called Robotaxis, which will begin production in 2024 and be unveiled in the next two years.

Musk says it will be further optimized for autonomy, meaning no steering wheel or pedals.

“There are other innovations that I think are very interesting, but they are mostly optimized to get the lowest cost per mile or kilometer when all things considered.”

The Cybertruck, a futuristic, angular armored vehicle that will go into production next year, has ended a nearly three-year wait for pre-order owners. humanoid optimus robot

The Tesla Semi, a battery-powered truck, was introduced in 2017 and should begin production next year. Reservations can be made on the company’s website.

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